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My firm belief is that the more info I share, the more value I give.

Helping those who help themselves.

I get asked if I will mentor regularly, the answer is always no. The reason is simple. I don't want to do every aspect of a deal and teach someone to do it too, for half the deal.

I prefer just to tell people how they can make money off/with me. Got money but no time, fine; Ill put together the deals, verify the number, negotiate the deal, and supervise its undertaking. Got time and no money, fine; Ill give you a list of stuff I am in need of and if you bring me it I will pay you. 

But that isn't "mentoring". As I overstate often; Time is more valuable than money. Giving my time to another for less than everything is not my cup of tea. I am not in this world to prop up others. But guess what I do love? Motivated hustlers who don't make excuses, but make things happen. "I can't" isn't something I put up with. There are always expectations, but the rule for me is simple. If I can do it, so can you. I am no smarter than anyone else. I just don't give up as quick.

I have "mentored" people, but not for a split of their deal. But because I saw them busting their hump to make things happen. Not because I wanted to take credit for part of their success, but because I know those types are the kind that will remember those who helped and did so out of good business, not charity, and will pay it "forward". 

One thing people never talk about in this business is that doing full review of the details of whos in the deal. I have met tons of "experts" who turns out haven't even done a deal successfully. Knowing what to avoid is important, but understanding the deep learning it takes to obtain a quick evaluation on deals, and the dealers is vital to success.  

I don't mentor, I help those who help themselves; because a lot of times those people come back and work with me in the future. The communication and relationship already established, it makes "working" the deal more like running drills with an old teammate.

Jeph Burnett